What does “No acute cardiopulmonary findings” mean?

  • What does “No acute cardiopulmonary findings” mean?

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    , Head of Medical Services, Head of Reaserch at Cell Dynamics

    It means that on physical examination lungs and heart appear normal.

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    , MSN from SUNY Upstate Medical Center (1995)

    Acute is the opposite of chronic. It means there are no interventions needed at this time although a person might have an underlying disease that was present before they had symptoms which led them to seek treatment. The CXR probably showed no abnormal densities or fluid and the size and shape of the lungs and heart has not changed, there are no new arrhythmias. If an echocardiogram was done it means there is no new changes in cardiac efficiency. The wall motion and valves are stable.

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    , Retired general internist, former intensive care physician.

    Heart and lung are OK, nothing acutely wrong causing acute symptoms, often written in the report on anxious young stressed out people presenting themselves with non-physical chest pains.

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    , former Work: front & back office/Taught Office Managing at Medicine and Healthcare (1971-2013)

    More than likely it means there’s some sign of changes in your heart/lungs but nothing that is currently causing any issues or needs immediate attention.

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    , MSA/LPN at CSL Plasma (2007-present)

    Means that whatever the rest done nothing of acute nature was seen with your heart and lungs. So your Dr probably said you are fine with your heart and lungs.

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    No immediate heart or lung problems at this time.

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    , formerly pharmacist and ENT surgeon

    This is a terminology found on radiographic reports to indicate that the aorta is slightly longer than needed for the distance covered. When worded in this manner, it should have little significance and represents acceptable anatomic variation.

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    , Physician – Diagnostic Radiologist

    In theory, the answer is that it could; however, it is understood by (at least all competent practicing Primary Care) Physicians that it does not exclude an acute pulmonary embolism!

    Let’s examine a similar radiologic presentation. Suppose a 35 yo male presents with acute SOB and a PA & Lateral CXR is interpreted by me as “normal.”

    Does my impression exclude the possibility of there being any acute cardiopulmonary disease?

    The answer is NO, of course not!

    If I told you, the OP, that at a minimum,…

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    , former Trauma and Vascular Surgeon

    A sentence which can be found in an CXR report. It usually means that there is no active pathological process going on in the lungs. It may not, however, refer to a mass which would be described elsewhere in the report.

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    , RN with Critical Care experience

    When a radiologist reads a chest x-ray, he will look at a number of things, such as whether the lungs are fully inflated or whether there is evidence of pneumonia or tumor. The radiologist will always comment on these findings, regardless of whether it has any bearing on the presumed diagnosis. In this case, the radiologist is reporting two normal findings – No evidence of pneumothorax means that the lungs are properly inflated and no evidence of focal consolidation means that there is no unusual fluid or scarring in the lungs that might be pneumonia. These are normal findings that have no

    When a radiologist reads a chest x-ray, he will look at a number of things, such as whether the lungs are fully inflated or whether there is evidence of pneumonia or tumor. The radiologist will always comment on these findings, regardless of whether it has any bearing on the presumed diagnosis. In this case, the radiologist is reporting two normal findings – No evidence of pneumothorax means that the lungs are properly inflated and no evidence of focal consolidation means that there is no unusual fluid or scarring in the lungs that might be pneumonia. These are normal findings that have no relation to a pulmonary embolus except to rule out other possible causes for the patient’s symptoms. A chest x-ray does not show a pulmonary embolus.

    “Acute Cardiopulmonary Process” is a general term for any one of several diagnoses involving a sudden effect on heart or lung function—a myocardial infarction (heart attack) or pulmonary embolism (blood clot traveling to the lung), for example. The term is usually used as a “placeholder” or catch-all term when a specific diagnosis is pending or unavailable.

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